Feasibility, Reliability, and Long-term Prognostic Capability of the International Standards to Document Autonomic Function after Spinal Cord Injury (ISAFSCI) during acute inpatient rehabilitation Module

The Feasibility, Reliability, and Long-term Prognostic Capability of the International Standards to Document Autonomic Function after Spinal Cord Injury (ISAFSCI) during acute inpatient rehabilitation – Mount Sinai Lead Module is part of the Mount Sinai Spinal Cord Injury Model System. Participants in this research study can participate in this specific module if they qualify for the MAIN STUDY.

For the estimated millions of people living with SCI globally, impaired Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) regulation can lead to cardiovascular dysfunction, adverse changes in bowel and bladder control, abnormal sweating and temperature regulation, disrupted immune function, and cardiometabolic syndromes. Many people with SCI prioritize restoration of ANS function above regaining the ability to walk; as such, focus has increased substantially regarding the secondary consequences of ANS dysfunction in the SCI community. This study aims to use the recently developed and revised International Standards to document Autonomic Function following SCI (ISAFSCI), to improve the clinical monitoring of ANS disorders in newly injured patients with SCI across several health care facilities. The primary objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of collecting ISAFSCI information in conjunction with administration of the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of SCI (ISNCSCI) to inform widespread integration of the ISAFSCI into clinical practice for monitoring the ANS functions during acute inpatient rehabilitation (AIR) following SCI. Eligible participants will include newly injured patients admitted to the AIR units of participating SCIMS centers who meet the SCIMS eligibility criteria and are admitted during the 42-month recruitment period. Objectively and accurately assessing the degree of ANS dysfunction following SCI and tracking changes over time and in response to therapeutic intervention will ultimately lead to improved clinical care, health, and well-being.

For more information please contact: Christine Hyun at ChristineS.Hyun@mountsinai.org / or Jorge Chavez at Jorge.Chavez2@mountsinai.org.

Jill M Wecht, EdD is the principal investigator of this model system project.