In the news

Going live: How microRNAs might bring living vaccines back into the fold.  billion-year arms race against viruses shaped our evolution  Nature MedicineMarch 2018.  How microRNAs might bring living vaccines back into the fold

A billion-year arms race against viruses shaped our evolution  Nature.comJun 28, 2017.  But in 2010, tenOever witnessed an odd phenomenon: Drosha appeared to leave the nucleus of human cells whenever a virus invaded. “That was weird and made us curious,” tenOever says. His team later confirmed the finding, and saw that Drosha demonstrates the same behaviour in cells from flies, fish …

“Fossil” Antiviral System May Furnish Bones of New RNA-Based …Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology NewsJun 29, 2017. Led by Benjamin R. tenOever, Ph.D., these scientists traced the evolution of three generations of the ancient system. The scientists even speculate that the system goes back to the first prokaryotes. Whether the line back to single-celled organisms such as bacteria and archaea is continuous or not, variants …

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It? The ScientistJul 21, 2017. Among their various arguments, tenOever and the others pointed out that the small RNAs used as evidence for an RNAi response in mature somatic cells were “just hundreds out of the millions of small RNA reads analyzed,” in contrast to the voluminous surge in siRNAs seen when plant or invertebrate …

Mount Sinai and Institut Pasteur Announce Affiliation Newswise (press release)Nov 27, 2017Benjamin tenOever, PhD, Professor of Microbiology, Irene and Dr. Arthur M. Fishberg Professor of Medicine, and Director of the Virus Engineering Center for Therapeutics and Research (VECToR) at ISMMS, will co-lead AVENUe with Marco Vignuzzi, PhD, Director of the Viral Population and Pathogenesis …

Study Turns Up Viral Key That Might Lead to Universal Flu Treatment. Popular ScienceJun 4, 2010. This helps the body’s immune system build up its defenses, according to Benjamin tenOever, an assistant microbiology professor at Mount Sinai and a study author. The process used to make this discovery is also groundbreaking, the researchers say. The deep sequencing allowed the scientists to obtain …

A Scientist’s Infectious Enthusiasm ScienceCareers.org. In late 2007, during the early months of his faculty position at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, Benjamin tenOever faced a wrinkle in his research plans. Experienced in looking at how cells respond to viruses, he’d set his sights on microRNA and how these small molecular segments that …

The Scientist Corps: 1000 Scientists in 1000 Days. Scientific American (blog)Jan 20, 2012, NY1 created a lovely video, Chelsea Students Change Their Scientific Perceptions, of one such volunteer, microbiologist Benjamin tenOever, when he visited a New York City classroom. As you ll see, he wasn’t what some students were expecting. I felt inspired by the video, and thought you might like it, …

President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists. National Science Foundation (press release)Jul 13, 2009. Jason R. Petta, Princeton University Justin K. Romberg, Georgia Institute of Technology Adrienne D. Stiff-Roberts, Duke University Benjamin R. tenOever, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine Joel A. Tropp, California Institute of Technology Derek H. Warner, Cornell University Sharon M. Weiss, Vanderbilt University