Updated Post Doc Stipends and Salaries Effective December 31, 2018

Pursuant to the Memorandum from Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs regarding updates to the post doc salary and stipend levels, the Grants and Contracts Office (GCO) has included these updates in its guidance document linked below.

Students and Post Graduates on Federal Research and Training Grants Guidance – A Compendium of Budgetary, Administrative, Application Submission, and Post Award Information

To recap, below are the updated rates:

Post Doc Minimum Salary

Years of Experience Current Eff. 12/31/2018
50,700 58,661
1 50,700 58,661
2 50,700 58,661
3 51,324 58,661
4 53,184 58,661
5 55,308 58,661
6 57,528 58,661
7 or more 59,736 59,736

Please note, regarding the use of these amounts on NIH training grant budgets, this supplementation is not reflected on the budget and does not require a cost sharing form to GCO, but the availability of funds should be considered by the PI/Department when submitting applications.

Please contact the GCO if you have any questions.

 

Updated Health Insurance and Graduate Student Rates Effective July 1, 2018

Pursuant to the 7/18/18 Memorandum from Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs regarding changes to health insurance and graduate student rates, the Grants and Contracts Office (GCO) has included these updates in its guidance document linked below.

Students and Post Graduates on Federal Research and Training Grants Guidance – A Compendium of Budgetary, Administrative, Application Submission, and Post Award Information

To recap, below are the updated rates:

Graduate Student Total Compensation

Current  Eff. 7/1/18
Direct Compensation         36,000        37,000
Health Insurance           7,335          7,999
Tuition/Fees           1,749          1,795
Total Compensation         45,130        46,794

All the relevant sections of GCO’s guidance document have been updated including the post doctoral sections since the health insurance rate has changed.  

Please contact the GCO if you have any questions.

 

NIH Loan Repayment Programs (LRP) Application Cycle Opens September 1st

Are you a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or permanent resident who spends and will continue to spend at least 20 hours per week on research?  Do you have a doctoral degree (M.D., or Ph.D. or equivalent)?*  Is your educational debt at least 20% of your annual salary? If the answer is YES to all of these questions, you are encouraged to apply to the NIH Loan Repayment Programs (LRP).

Awardees can receive up to $70,000 of qualified educational debt repayment with a two-year contract. Please share this valuable information with your colleagues!

The LRP application cycle is open from September 1st – November 15th. Go to www.lrp.nih.gov to learn more about eligibility requirements, application dates, and many benefits of the program.

Get Ready for the New Application Cycle!

* All LRP recipients must have doctoral degrees with the exception of the LRP-CIR for Contraception and Infertility Research.

 

GCO New Staff and Promotions

The Grants and Contracts Office (GCO) is pleased to announce a new staff addition and promotions as well.

Victoria Speziale joins the GCO team as a Grants Specialist serving the departments of Clinical Immunology/Medicine, Genetics and Genomics, Neurosurgery, OB-GYN and Reproductive Science, Rehabilitation Medicine, and Rheumatology/Medicine while Sarah Sanders is on leave.  Victoria previously worked as a Senior Contracts Coordinator at Northwell Health and has approximately 3 years of prior grants and contracts management experience including working with InfoEd.

Michelle Yoon has been promoted to Senior Grants Specialist having served as Grants Specialist II for 2 years in the GCO.  Michelle came to the GCO with 7 years of experience as a clinical research coordinator at Mount Sinai.

Amanda Amescua has been promoted from Assistant Director to Associate Director after approximately 1 year which indicates how competent she is in this leadership position.  Previously Amanda served as a Senior Grants Specialist for 3 years in the GCO.   Amanda has an additional approximate 10 years of prior sponsored project administration experience including positions at Columbia University Medical Center, Duke University Medical Center, and the University of Texas at Austin.

Please join us in congratulating our talented and hardworking staff.

 

NIH Transitions from Inclusion Management System to New Human Subjects System (HSS) as of June 9, 2018

Excerpt from NIH Notice (NOT-OD-18-179)
NIH has developed a new Human Subjects System (HSS), which consolidates human subjects and clinical trial information in one place.

Information captured in HSS is generally submitted on the PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information form in application packages submitted for due dates January 25, 2018 or later and Research Progress Performance Reports (RPPR).

Post-submission updates to human subjects and clinical trial-related information (including human subjects protections, participant and enrollment information, and Clinicaltrials.gov registration and reporting information) must be made in HSS via the eRA Commons Status page after June 9, 2018.

HSS will replace the Inclusion Management System (IMS), used for reporting participant sex/gender, race, and ethnicity information.  The Inclusion link will no longer appear on the Commons Status page as of June 9, 2018.

Please read NOT-OD-18-179 for complete information on key changes.

Other Resources

NIH’s Human Subjects System (HSS) Info Page

On Line Video Tutorials

Overview of the New HSS System

Accessing Human Subjects System for SOs and PIs

Questions? Please reach out to the Grants and Contracts Office at grants@mssm.edu.

 

GCO New Staff Additions and a Promotion

The Grants and Contracts Office (GCO) is pleased to announce new staff additions and a promotion as well.

David Dalton joined the GCO team as a Grants Coordinator.  David previously worked for the Program for the Protection of Human Subjects (PPHS) office for approximately 6 years where his primary responsibility was intake of electronic submissions.   David’s GCO responsibilities include processing the intake of InfoEd applications and Sinai Central forms.

Photo from Left to Right: David Dalton, Sarah Sanders, Edwin Berrios, Jennifer Oluoch-Kore

Sarah Sanders is a new Grants Specialist II for the GCO. Sarah previously was employed as  a Subawards Manager at Columbia University.  Notably, Sarah was a recipient of the Oprah Winfrey Fellowship for African Women in Public Service at the Wagner School of Public Service.

Edwin Berrios has been promoted to Grants Specialist I after 10 months of employment in the GCO as a Grants Coordinator.   Grants Specialist responsibilities include reviewing projects for accurate administrative and budgetary information and compliance with extramural and institutional regulations.

Jennifer Oluoch-Kore has joined the group a Senior Contracts Specialist.  Jennifer has over 5 years of experience as a subaward manager working at Engender Health Inc. and Columbia University.  Contracts Specialist responsibilities include the review and negotiation of sponsored project agreements.

Please join us in welcoming our new staff and congratulating Edwin Berrios on his promotion.

GCO Helpful Hints- To Be or Not Be (An NIH Clinical Trial) That is the Question

To Be or Not To Be…. The single most powerful soliloquy ever written by man..

Encapsulating the frailty of  the human condition in one stark sentence.
One man overwrought by feelings of despair, indecision, and confusion.
Is there any wonder this quote can be applied to NIH’s new definition of a clinical trial (eff w/ competitive apps. w/ due dates 1/25/18 and later)?

Have you asked yourself these other 4 questions… the ones that will provide the answer you need… the ones that will pull you out of any existential NIH clinical trial conundrum, and put you on the path leading to a successful application?

  1. Does the study involve human participants?
  2. Are the participants prospectively assigned to an intervention?
  3. Is the study designed to evaluate the effect of the intervention on the participants?
  4. Is the effect that will be evaluated a health-related biomedical or behavioral outcome?

If you’ve answered Yes to all of these questions, you’ve got yourself an NIH Clinical Trial.  Note that no other entity but the NIH (although there are no guarantees in this fast paced world, folks.. we will do our best to keep you informed) uses this definition.  So be sure you remember to whom you are speaking or to which funding agency you are applying before stating unequivocally, “To Be or Not to Be!” I mean “Yes, I have a clinical trial!”  If you’re still not sure or need additional resources to help navigate you through, please see the list towards the bottom of this email.

Besides this NIH definition, all should be aware of NIH’s new Human Subjects and Clinical Trial (HS/CT) form in which the top portion must be completed even if you are doing research on potato spuds.*  This form has a sub-form called the “Study Record” form and embedded in that is the sub-sub form entitled the “Inclusion Enrollment Report,” which should sound familiar to veteran applicants.  Recently, Research IT released its instructions for completing this form, which includes what’s required in each section. Click here to view Research IT’s instructions on the form.

If there was ever a time to submit to the Grants and Contracts Office (GCO) EARLY or at least 5 business days prior to your NIH deadline, now is the time.

But before you submit, make that way before you submit, choose the correct funding opportunity announcement (FOA). (Parenthically speaking, the updated FOAs include some pretty important information within the parentheses in the FOA title, namely “(Clinical Trial Not Allowed),” or “(Clinical Trial Required)” or “(Clinical Trial Optional.)”)

And no worries..if you are holding a specimen like this Shakespeare playing Hamlet, you can safely say No to Clinical Trials.  If your protocol does contain a resuscitation intervention, answer Yes.

NIH Clinical Trial Resources

Videos and Podcasts

Video (approx. 15 minutes) – Overview of New NIH Policies on Human Subjects Research and Clinical Trials

* Did you know that according to Wikipedia,  “The word (spud) has an unknown origin and was originally (c. 1440) used as a term for a short knife or dagger, probably related to the Latin “spad-” a word root meaning “sword”; cf. Spanish “espada”, English “spade” and “spadroon”?”  This was approximately 160 years before Shakespeare wrote Hamlet.

 

GCO Helpful Hints- Believe It or Not, YOU are Doing an NIH Clinical Trial

It is not business as usual at the NIH for competitive applications due Jan 25, 2018 and after. The NIH has a new definition of a clinical trial and with that comes a new Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Info (HS/CT) form and new requirements even for basic science researchers.

Step 1 –  BEFORE You Apply, Answer These 4 Questions.

1. Does the study involve human participants?
2. Are the participants prospectively assigned to an intervention?
3. Is the study designed to evaluate the effect of the intervention on the participants?

If you say No – ask yourself when I read question 3 above did I read “efficacy” rather than “effect?” NIH is asking about ANY “effect.” This is much broader.  Please reconsider.

4. Is the effect that will be evaluated a health-related biomedical or behavioral outcome?

If you say No – ask yourself when I read question 4 above did I read “improve or cure any disease or symptom of a medical or psychological condition or syndrome?”  NIH is asking about ANY  “health-related biomedical or behavioral outcome.”   This is much broader.  Please reconsider.

If the answer is Yes to all 4 questions, your study is an NIH clinical trial.

Step 2 – Choose the CORRECT Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)

Many of NIH’s updated FOAs include the following information in the title:
– Clinical Trial Not Allowed
– Clinical Trial Required
– Clinical Trial Optional

If you apply to the wrong FOA, your application will be rejected.

Step 3 – Complete the Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information (HS/CT) Form

Your application will be rejected if completed incorrectly. Please see list below of possible reasons.

  • You did not answer the Clinical Trials Questions correctly at the top of this form.  See Step 1 for more information.
  • You completed sections of the form that are not required for your study.
  • And the opposite – you didn’t complete the sections of the form that are required for your study.
  • You did not follow the character limitation rule.

Click here to view Research IT’s instructions on the form.  These instructions highlight requirements to help you avoid the pitfalls written above.

Other Resources
Contact the Program Officer on the FOA if you have questions. Get in writing whether your study is a clinical trial.

NIH Clinical Trial Resources

Videos and Podcasts

GCO FAQs
Below are some questions GCO Staff has received regarding NIH’s new HS/CT form and the NIH’s new Clinical Trial Policy in general.  We are passing the answers along to you.

FAQs on NIH’s new Human Subject and Clinical Trials Information Form

1. Q: I am not doing human subjects research. Therefore, I don’t need to complete the new form, correct?
A: Incorrect. There are questions that must be answered in the top portion of the form even if you are not doing human subject research.   All competitive NIH applications include the new form.

  1. Q: I am not doing a safety and efficacy study. In fact I am only using healthy volunteers.  Therefore, NIH’s new policies on Clinical Trials do not apply to me, correct?
    A:  Incorrect.  You might be doing a study the NIH defines as a clinical trial and therefore be subject to the new requirements.  NIH’s definition of clinical trials is very broad and includes research that one intuitively would not think is a clinical trial.  Please review NIH’s new definition, case studies/examples plus the training and resource material available to make the determination.
  2. Q: I am not doing a safety and efficacy study. In fact I am only studying the pharmacokinetics of a drug.  Therefore, NIH’s new policies on Clinical Trials do not apply to me, correct?
    A: Incorrect. Same response at # 2 above.
  3. From the NIH Case Studies website
    Q:  The study involves the recruitment of healthy volunteers who will be randomized to different durations of sleep deprivation (including no sleep deprivation as a control) and who will have stress hormone levels measured. It is designed to determine whether the levels of stress hormones in blood rise in response to different durations of sleep deprivation. Is this a clinical trial?
    A: Yes, this is a NIH Clinical Trial. See Case #9 on the NIH site for more complete information.

Questions about Sponsored Projects? Please click here for a listing of Departmental Grants Specialists at the GCO who can help you.

 

InfoEd Instructions For Submissions Started Prior to Upgrade

The Grants and Contracts Office conducted a major upgrade of InfoEd on Friday, November 17, 2017, and it may have affected some users’ submissions. Researchers may need to take additional steps to ensure that their submissions are properly completed.

If you started your project in InfoEd prior to the upgrade, which began at 5 pm of 11/17, and it has not already been received by the GCO, please be aware that finalizing, routing and sign off may be impaired since the old template will not convert to the new template properly without a manual intervention.  Below are the steps to fix it:

  1. Go into the Setup Questions > Please select a Submission Mechanism/Screen Template.  In this drop down, select any choice.  Then re-select yours. This refreshes the program and creates the correct InfoEd application.
  2. You must re-upload your Lay Summary, Research Plan, Progress Report, and/or Final Report in the appropriate tabs.
  3. You should now see the eForm as a stand alone tab.  If it’s new, the eForm is called “New/Competitive Renewals/…”.  For other projects, it is called “Non-Competi Cont/Supplement…”
  4. On the eForm, please answer q. 16 re: location again.

Technical support for InfoEd applications is available by opening a Ticket with Research IT.

 

Must See Videos and Podcasts for Human Subjects Researchers

The Grants and Contracts Office (GCO) strongly recommends that human subjects researchers take advantage of educational resources issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to inform grants applications submitted for due dates on or after January 25, 2018.

A primary component of NIH’s initiative to enhance the stewardship of clinical trials is the creation of a new application form that consolidates all Human Subjects and Clinical Trial related information into one place, and also expands the information required for studies that meet the NIH definition of a clinical trial. This new form will be included in the new FORMS-E Application Packages and will be required for all applications with due dates on or after January 25, 2018.

To support this endeavor for Mount Sinai Health System (MSHS) researchers, the GCO would like to highlight the following NIH resources:

To learn more about the new Human Subjects and Clinical Trial Information form which will be included in grant application packages and contract for all human subjects and/or clinical trial research applications beginning for January 25, 2018 due dates, visit the NIH New Human Subjects and Clinical Trial Information Form web site.

For more information about conducting human subjects research at MSHS, please contact the Program for the Protection of Human Subjects.

For more information about NIH grant submissions at MSHS, please click here for a listing of Departmental Grants Specialists at the GCO who can assist you.