Department of Corporate and Foundation Relations Announces Funding Opportunities

The Department of Corporate and Foundation Relations of the Mount Sinai Development Office offers this curated list of funding opportunities to faculty who may be interested, and it also provides assistance with the application process for these programs. Interested investigators can contact them by emailing CorpFoundHelp@mountsinai.org to find out more.

The Sontag Foundation Distinguished Scientist Award:
https://www.sontagfoundation.org/Display.aspx?id=44

The Sontag Foundation is looking for early career scientists with the potential to create new waves across the brain cancer field. They are looking for increased survival rates and improved recovery for patients.

  • Projects are funded for four years, for a maximum of $600,000.
  • Application deadline: March 16, 2016

Whitehall Foundation Research Grants:
http://www.whitehall.org/grants/

The Whitehall Foundation, through its program of grants and grants-in-aid, assists scholarly research in the life sciences. It is the Foundation’s policy to assist those dynamic areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by Federal Agencies or other foundations with specialized missions. In order to respond to the changing environment, the Whitehall Foundation periodically reassesses the need for financial support by the various fields of biological research.

  • Typical grants are for up to $225,000
  • Letter of Inquiry deadlines: April 15 and October 1

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation Young Investigators Program:
http://www.beckman-foundation.org/byi-program-guidelines

The BYI program funds promising young scientists early in their careers who have not yet received a major award from another organization. Projects proposed should be truly innovative, high-risk, and show promise for contributing to significant advances in chemistry and the life sciences.

  • Projects are normally funded for a period of four years, in the range of $750,000 over the term of the project.
  • Letter of Inquiry deadline: Spring 2016
  • Please contact us if interested.

Gerber Foundation:
http://www.gerberfoundation.org/pd-research/research-awards/application-process

The Gerber Foundation’s mission focuses on the nutrition, care and development of infants and young children. Therefore, grant-making interests are focused on nutrition and/or health-related research having a significant impact on issues facing infants and young children from the first year before birth to age 3. The Foundation is particularly interested in fresh approaches to solving newborn or pediatric problems or emerging issues with a predictable time frame to clinical application. Projects should be focused on issues faced by care providers that, when implemented, will improve the health, nutrition and/or developmental outcomes for infants and young children.

  • Letter of Inquiry deadline: June 1, 2016

Damon Runyon Rachleff Innovation Award:
https://www.damonrunyon.org/for-scientists/application-guidelines/innovation

The Damon Runyon-Rachleff Award is designed to provide support for the next generation of exceptionally creative thinkers with “high-risk/high-reward” ideas that have the potential to significantly impact our understanding of and/or approaches to the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of cancer.

  • The initial award will be for two years, at $150,000/yr, with the opportunity for up to two additional years of funding, for a potential total of $600,000.
  • Application deadline: July 1, 2016

 

Rolling Deadline Opportunity: Please email CorpFoundHelp@mountsinai.org if you are interested in this rolling deadline program, and the Department of Corporate and Foundation Relations will facilitate approaching the foundation.

Broad Medical Research Program @ Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America

Research grants are available for innovative proposals that will lead to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis, or therapy of Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. BMRP-CCFA especially supports research that can be readily translated to improve the care of human IBD in the near future.