Rosalind Wright Assumes Leadership Roles in Translational Research

Effective November 1, Rosalind Wright, MD, MPH assumed the dual leadership roles of Dean of Translational Biomedical Research and Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

As Dean for Translational Biomedical Research, Dr. Wright provides leadership for clinical and population-based research across the Mount Sinai Health System, applying her expertise and vast experience to supporting and growing our research endeavors. This role dovetails with her directorship of the CTSA, recently re-funded by the NIH to foster high-quality translational research, research education, and the development of innovative resources. Through Mount Sinai’s Conduits program, the CTSA spurs collaborations among clinicians, patients, and scientists, and builds partnerships across a national network of CTSA programs.

“As technological advances and evolving insights into disease causation and individual variation increase the complexity of research and its translation into clinical practice, we are challenged with moving forward integrated team science that informs what genes, environment and life stage mean to defining normal variations and altered health trajectories throughout the life course and across generations,” said Dr. Wright of her new roles. “This is an exciting time for science and medicine with Mount Sinai continuing to lead the way.”

Dr. Wright is a Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Preventive Medicine. As a pulmonologist and life course epidemiologist, she has special expertise in prenatal and early childhood factors contributing to the programming of chronic diseases. She has built a large National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded research program focused on understanding the role of both chemical and non-chemical social stressors in perinatal programming of conditions such as asthma, obesity, cardiometabolic disorders, and neurodevelopment, particularly as they relate to health disparities in socioeconomically challenged urban populations. Dr. Wright’s pioneering research on the role of social factors and toxic stress on disease programming starting in pregnancy was recently recognized through her election as a fellow to the National Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research.

As we welcome Dr. Wright, we want to thank Hugh Sampson, MD, who is scaling back his administrative positions at Mount Sinai to assume a role as Chief Scientific Officer for DVB Technologies, a company that is developing treatments for pediatric food allergies. We wish him well in his new external position and, at the same time, are pleased that he will continue to be a visible, vibrant presence in the Icahn School of Medicine research community.